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Superstitions and History view 3



SOURCE:
CY1388
On the HMS DROMEDARY accommodation by the Hindustan
Departed Yarmouth to Port Jackson may 1809 arriving April 1810

SITE SOURCE: MARITIME

ACCOUNT OF VOYAGE TO SYDNEY BY ENSIGN ALEXANDER HUEY

After lying two or three days at anchor at the entrance (to port Jackson), the wind came fair. We weighed anchor on Sunday and sailed up the harbour in Sydney Cove at 3.00 o’clock. A number of people were assembled on the shore and the wharf. It was quite calm. The water was as smooth as a millpond. We dropped anchor about five fathom of water about twelve yards from the shore. The band played some of our favourite tunes. A party of natives, about sixteen in number, assembled around a fire on the shore and danced. At 11 o’clock at night we could se the natives around the fire and hear them distinctly singing songs and beating time on a shield.

This day, Sunday 31stDecember, the Governor (Macquarie) boarded. The 73rd Regiment was drawn up in a marching order on board the ships. When his Excellency came out of his cabin to get into the Dromedary, the Regiment presented arms; the colours dropped and the jolly tars gave three cheers. When the boats shoved off, the ships fired a salute of fifteen guns each. The 102nd Regiment formed a street to receive His Excellency when he went ashore. This day the natives assembled from the Hawkesbury and many miles round and fought a regular battle in honour of the new Governor. I saw three of the natives who had come from a distant part of the country just before the battle began, and spoke to them. They said they were going to fight when the sun was two hours down. Afterwards the 73rd Regiment wheeled into line and marched off to Grose Farm Camp, about three miles from Sydney. When they arrived at 2.00 o’clock, found all the tents pitched. Nothing to eat this day but potatoes. Our breakfast in general consisted of potatoes and water. However, we got on by degree and in the course of a week we could procure bread and coffee or tea. Bread was very dear at one shilling for a tuppenny loaf. Killed a centipede in the mess tent. Two large snakes were killed in the camp.