Sydney place names and their history


SYDNEY PLACE NAMES AND THEIR HISTORY

THE BAY OF BISCAY

This is now the small lake at Sydney University of Parramatta and City Roads. It got its name because of the number of bullock drays that got bogged there.

 

THE HELP THE MAN THROUGH THE WORLD INN

Owned by Mr Stephenson in the 1850s, the hotel was on Glebe Rd and its sign showed the figure of a man through a globe of the world.

 

THE HUNGRY MILE

The strip between Walsh Bay and Pyrmont Bridge was known as the ‘Hungry Mile’ during the Great depression of 1930. Men, woman and children, mostly waiting for sustenance be it light work, ration cards or the soup line, assembled here and some even lived in makeshift accommodation.

 

NO GO ZONE

Custom of a bell being rung at 6pm on the corner of College and Oxford streets, Paddington, as a warning that females should not venture into the suburb after dark. This possibly had something to do with the fact that the suburb was the home of Victoria Army Barracks.

 

THE CAFE FRANCAIS

.(in George Street) iwas much frequented by the young swells and sprigs of the city. They held here a chess club, a billiard club, and a tweed-kidney club. Little marble tables, files of Punch and the ‘Times’, dominoes, sherry cobblers, strawberry ices, an entertaining hostess, and a big, bloused, lubberly, inoffensive host, were the noticeable points of the Cafe. They served 800 dinners a day.

 

THE SYDNEY TURKISH BATHS The Sydney Turkish Baths were extremely popular as a remedial opportunity and, seemingly more important, as a source of gossip.

Future advertisement showed it was still there in 1889.

 

SLAVE MARKET

The Bells Hotel, Woolloomooloo, where maritime storemen and packers were hired. This hotel was originally known as the Three Bells and colloquially as the Bunch of Cunts.

 

THE THREE WEEDS

Hotels called the Rose, Shamrock and Thistle were inevitably called the Three Weeds.

 

OPERATION PARK

The Bondi Beach Esplanade because of the elderly people who daily promenade there.

 

DOUCHE-CAN ALLEY

Kings Cross Road.

 

MOSSIE

A Mosman resident.

 

THE BARBECUE BELT

A reference to the leafy northern suburbs of Sydney.

 

STORMTROOPER ALLEY

Kings Cross at the Victoria Street end.

 

POVERTY POINT

Corner of Park and Pitt streets, Sydney.

 

ROOTY HILL

Reference to Kings Cross (root a sin sexual act) although Rooty Hill is actually a western Sydney suburb.

 

LARPY

Colloquial name for la Perouse residents

 

HAIR BUILDINGS

The hair of horse, cattle and goats was used to strengthen the mortar of early Sydney buildings. Many of the women from the Female factory at Parramatta also sold their hair to builders.