SHILOH and BARLOW


 

SHILOH and BARLOW

 

 

This next song appears under the banner of an ‘advertisement’ and says it is ‘Part one’. I have note found vol. 2 as yet but, as readers can imagine, I am on the hunt.
I doubt if it is actually an ‘advertisement’ as it isn’t selling anything. And Mr Shiloh, one assumes, was the person who conceived the idea of graziers becoming butchers. Oh dear oh! In a statement in the same newspaper I located a paid ‘plea’ signed by Theodore Bartlett who is mentioned in the song as ‘Justice Bartlett; calling for a ban on all imported (from the mainland) meats.

 

SHILOH AND BARLOW

 

Ye merchants, tradesmen and publicans too,
I’ve come to inform you what you should do –
To stay Mr Justice Bartley & co,
From becoming playmates of Billy Barlow!
O the wool market is low,
The graziers are trembling, says Mr Shiloh.

 

They have treaten’d the whole of the butchers in town,
That some should be whitewashed and others done brown;
That Dyson should croke, and Butland also,
That all were to be ruin’d by Billy Barlow.
O the wool market is low,
The farmers’ turn’d butcher says Mr Shiloh.

 

It’s a very bad job for graziers you’ll find,
That T.B & Co., to butchering are inclin’d;
They will reduce the colonial stock very low,
Colonial sheep are scarce, says Mr Shiloh.

‘Tis good for the poor, you all will admit,
That two gentlemen farmers have ta’en such a fit –
As to give the sheep growers such a terrible blow,
By making meat lower, says Billy Barlow.
O the wool market is low,
And it’s a sad job for graziers says Mr Shiloh.

 

The whole of the graziers very well know,
That meat lowering gives them a terrible blow;
But who can be blam’d, not the butchers I trow –
“Let’s raise the price now,” says Billy Barlow.
O the wool market is low,
‘Twill whitewash some settlers, says Mr Shiloh.

 

If in a mad fit, they find wrong they have done,
And attend to their farms, while the butch’ring shun;
The butchers will endeavour to give them a go,
And then meat will advance, says Billy Barlow.
O the wool market is low,
Twill ‘croke’ some graziers, says Mr Shiloh.

 

Cornwall Chronicle. Tasmania. 17 April 1849.