Emigration and Free Settlers view 5



source:
PICTURE OF SYDNEY & STRANGERS GUIDE
James Maclehos
RHS reprint of the original 1839

SITE SOURCE: GOLD, EMIGRATION AND FREE SELECTION

Hints to Emigrants

  1. Check out the vessel – ‘make sure that water closets and other conveniences are provided’.
  2. Obtain a proper paper signed by the captain or ship’s agent stating that ‘a quantity of fresh water to be allowed every passenger per diem of the passage’.
  3. Ditto provisions
  4. ‘Check departure day and time’ as ship’s depended on wind sail to leave safe harbours.
  5. On arrival (in Sydney), if necessary, passengers to be allowed to sleep on board for a further five or six days until suitable accommodation found.
  6. ‘Steerage passengers to insist on a light to be burning below deck all night and no smoking between decks.’ The risk of fire on board passenger vessels was always a major concern however the steerage decks would have been pitch black and midnight rambles would have been dangerous in regard to accidents, theft and assault.
  7. Take your own clean bedding properly named or numbered to avoid confusion or theft. Passengers will also find it advantageous to provide themselves with at least one bottle of caster oil, a few pounds of Epson Salts, a pound or two of cream of tartar, and other such medicines as their funds may enable them to purchase even although they may have stipulated that a surgeon is to accompany them’
  8. Because the voyage was extremely long ‘take some amusement. Writing is an amusement frequently employed, while, in well-regulated ships, dancing and singing are encouraged, under proper regulations, as a means of passing away the time.
  9. All emigrants ought to be particularly on their guard against the following things, viz: – drinking or gambling on the passage out, or after they land. All emigrants ought to be careful in forming hasty acquaintances in the colony or with their shipmates on the voyage hither.
  10. emigrants, when landed, all disposable cash should be placed, if above fifty pounds, in one of the Public Banks, or if under fifty pounds, in a Savings Bank.

NOTE: Further advice is given to those headed for an agricultural or mechanical employment recommending they bring tools of trade and ‘any newly invented things’.

Advice, surprisingly, was also given for Convicts. One assumes this information to be passed on to the Convicts by their families.