C-D


COLLOQUIAL SAYINGS AND SLANGUAGES

Antipodean Lexicon

A-B
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U-Z

CACKEY HANDER:

Somebody whose natural manual preference resides in their left hand.

CACKLEBERRY:

Same as BUM NUT, but without the relationship with BARKER’S EGGS.

CAME DOWN IN THE LAST SHOWER: An expression discrediting a person who is too new to know what has happened in the past. (Great expression in a drought. Shows the reverse humour of our larrikin origins.
CANOODLE: A publicly acceptable mild expression of affection, usually displayed in the younger generations.

CANE TOADS:

Not only the much hated  amphibians introduced to Australia, but the sound & smell they exude when they are squashed on the road & become WASSA’s, a term used to describe one’s breaking of wind..Farting.

CAT’S PYGAMAS:

Same as Bonza.

CATCH AS CATCH CAN:

A meal one gets for one’s self with whatever is available, when the cook isn’t going to supply it.

CHALK & CHEESE: 

The knowing of the metaphoric difference is very important, or one can end up in quite some bother.

CHALKIES:

Teachers, usually of Primary and Secondary schools, in the Public system

CHARGE LIKE A WOUNDED BULL:

To totally over inflate the price of something beyond a reasonable degree. Also called DAYLIGHT ROBBERY.

CHEESE & KISSES:

The Missus (wife)

CHINA PLATE:

Ya best Mate….could even be ya Cheese & Kisses!

CHOCK-A-BLOCK:

Full! Cannot handle any more. This comes from the nautical expression “Choke a Block” where two Blocks (pullies) have been drawn together, and there is no more room for them to move.

CHOCKERS:

To be very full. See CHOCK-A-BLOCK.

CHOOK:

The most often used word when referring to poultry.

CHOPPEY FOR CHANGEY:

Fair exchange, no robbery, and all equal in the end. QUITS.

CHUFFED:

To become pleased, excitedly happy, glad.

CHUNDER:

To vomit. This term is used for vomiting usually as a result of a Bender or a Blinder. It has many other variations, depending upon one’s dialect of one’s Local,(q.v.)

CLANGER:         

The gaffe one makes, specially in front of  their superiors. Clangers are dropped, as in” …..dropped a Clanger”.

CLAP YA LAUGHING GEAR AROUND THAT:

An expression meaning to get stuck into the food or drink which has just been offered you, without delay.  Another inference of  “TWO FOUR SIX EIGHT, DBOG IN, DON’T WAIT”.

CLAPPED OUT:

Most often used in reference to motor vehicles which are very near to, or actually at the end of their useful life. It can also be applied to other inanimate objects, and even a person who feels absolutely exhausted.

CLAYTONS:

From the trade name of a non alcoholic drink.  It is the drink you have, when you are not having a drink, et al. A substitute.

CLEVER BREECHES:

Same as SMARTY PANTS. A person who gets it right, or fixes a situation when others fail, but is very COCKY about it.

CLOBBER:

Firstly, to Clobber somebody or thing is to hit it with substantial force. This can be either really or metaphorically.
Secondly, Clobber refers to the clothing you are wearing, or about to select to be suitable for the occasion.

CLOD HOPPERS:

Heavy duty work boots worn by those on The Land, to protect their feet in hard earthed ploughed paddocks, but also now used to describe any hefty footwear.

CLOSE SHAVE:

A near miss…..a potential danger from which you have escaped by a Gnat’s Whisker.

CLOTHERED EARED:

A person who selects to not hear what they are being told, and will apply their own already resolved solution to the question they may have asked.

COBBER:

A Mate, friend, pal, or somebody you’ve just met, but have not yet established a proper relationship, yet  there is no ill-will.

COBBER:

A friend, or Mate, or a respectful address to someone you have only recently met.

COCK:

Of  similar usage as MATE. This term seems to have been relegated to the more remote areas of Oz, and is rarely heard in urban areas to-day.

COCKATOO:

Although being a bird, it is also the term used for the lookout of a gang engaged in a covert venture. It comes from the habit of one cockatoo (bird) perching on the highest position available, as lookout, whilst the rest of the gang raid the farmers crops.

COCKEY’S JOY:

A thick and very sweet syrup, which I remember coming in a tin of about  1lb (500Ml), which was put into everything to sweeten it, or disguise the nasty taste to make the food/drink/medicine, more palatable. It was viewed in its early days as a treat for the COCKEY, ( not the bird), but the owner or manager of a station or property. It was very common in the kitchens of the post WW11 years in which I was a youngster.

COCK-UP:

A mistake, error, wrong-going, a complete farce, disaster, depending on the importance of the COCK-UP.

COCKY (BOSS):  

The owner or manager of a property or station, usually of some substance.  

COCKY (PROUD):

That attitude presented by a person who thinks they are above those in their company. This was a very frowned upon attitude, specially by those who did “ the common  work” which kept everything running.

COD’S WALLOP: A reply to a non believable statement, a gentile manner of suggesting the statement is BULLSHIT. Probably from Cockney, et al, being the waste from a fish mongers trade. (Rare these days)
CODGER/COVE: A perhaps slightly denigrating referral to a man, as in, “What a silly old cove”. Rarely heard these days.

COLIWOBBLES:

An uncomfortable feeling in your stomach, perhaps related to mild colic, but which causes you to remain in a handy distance of a toilet.

COME BACK:

The assumed right to have retribution in the event of a COCK-UP.

CONKED OUT:

Exhausted. Dead. Ceased functioning.

COO-EE:

A vocal expression used to gain the attention of one or more people whose whereabouts maybe unknown. It is made in a very loud voice, with hands cupped around the mouth to concentrate the sound in the desired direction. The COO part is usually quite long, with the EE part being quite short, and at a high pitch. It seems to be  peculiarly Antipodean.

COSSIES:

  Costume, specially as in swimming attire, but is used in different regions of Australia to encompass general clothing. See TOGS

CREEP/CREEPY:

Not to make one’s way in a sneaky fashion, but to describe a person of displaying a very suspect manner, and be very suspicious about their real intent.

CROOK:

When one is not one’s self through “ill Health”. This is a common result of a BENDER or if you’re “real CROOK”  or a BLINDER. Licence is given in some states for a period of recovery, then after that, you’re on ya PAT MALONE.

DACKS:

Trousers, pants. Underpants are UNDER DACKS

DAD & DAVE:

A shave.

DAG:

The term strictly refers to the accumulation of faeces about a sheep’s anus & tail. This  mass (mess) if not removed, can cause fly-strike, and bring an animal down.

When applied to the human, it means one who is not necessarily conforming to their peer’s regard. Emphasis of the word will determine the extent of the value of its application.

DAMPER:

A party pooper, somebody who unreasonably wants to take the enjoyment out of a social affair. It is also the mixture of flour, water, sugar, and a little salt, cooked in a camp oven or in the embers of the camp fire, to become bread. It was the staple diet of SUNDOWNERS and SWAGGIES, and the great majority of families during the Depression. 

DAPTO DOGS:

Dapto is a town S.W of Wollongong where there is a strong greyhound racing fraternity. If  one has gone to the Dapto Dogs, one is really doing it tough.

DARBY AND JOAN:

A reference to a middle aged couple whose children have left home, and are enjoying the solitude of their live as they approach their senior years.

DATE:               

That area of your anatomy which is sat upon, and never sees the sun. It is derived from a bawdy song about the leopard having 365 spots, one for every day on the year. But what about Leap Years? Lift up its tail and there is the 29th of February.

DEAD RINGER:

An exact copy. (Not a campanologist who has fallen from the tower.)

DIDDLED:

Conned, taken down, swindled, cheated, DUDDED, etc.

DIE HARD:

A person who perseveres beyond reason.

DIGGER:

Not so commonly used to-day because of the generation gap, but Aussie soldiers are still very proud to be known as “diggers” as that is where the ANZAC i.e. was borne. The ANZAC troops had to “Dig in” for their own safety. This was continued into the European theatre of WW I, and also applied in WW II, hence the term.

DILLY BAG;

A carry-all of no particular design or size, but of great value to its owner.

DINKIE DI:

REAL. If it “ain’t Dinki Di”, it ain’t true!

DIVVIE UP:

 To divide/apportion something amongst a number of persons, usually unequally, according to their deserve.

DOB,DOB-IN:

See DOBBING.

DOBBER:

The doer of the DOBBING, and held in low regard.

DOBBING:

To DOB on somebody is considered a very lowly act, as they are being reported to a higher authority, when mostly the report is unnecessary, and the DOBBER is most interested in their own innocence in the matter.

DODGEY:      

Not to be trusted, relied upon, or taken at face value, but not necessarily of malice or dangerous intent.

DOG’S BREAKFAST:

A canine delight, which when eaten with gusto becomes strewn all about, creating an awful mess.

DOG’S EYE; 

Slang for a meat pie. If the pie is known to be not of the better standard, it is commonly referred to as such.

DON’T BUST YA BOILER:

Don’t work so hard as to damage yourself. This is usually applied to one who has a compulsion to get the job done a.s.a.p.

DON’T BUST YA BOILER:

Same as DON’T BUST YO GUT.

DON’T BUST YA GUT:

Don’t work so hard as to damage yourself. Slow down, and wait for assistance.

DON’T GET OFF YA BIKE:

Simmer down, count to ten, and relax. Usually applied to a person who is becoming STROPPY.

DON’T STIR THE POSSUM:

Leave well enough alone! Don’t create a worse situation.

DONNEYBROOK:

A fight, but not as serious as a STOUSH.

DOUBLE DUTCH:

An oxymoron, or other phrase which makes no sense.

DOUGH: (MONEY)   

That which we never seem to have enough of to achieve our desires.

DRONGO:

A silly person. One of intelligence deficit.

DROP LIKE FLIES:

People or animals who from shear exhaustion collapse, usually applied to a group situation.

DUCKS ON THE BOARDS:

A shearer’s term to alert the shed that there is a woman in their midst.

DUDDED:

Taken down, conned, duped, swindled.

DUMMY SPIT:

This is a lovely term to describe the actions of a person who is being very verbose in an irate manner, just as an infant spits their dummy when displeased.

DUNGAREES:

Denim trousers used by those in heavy work, specially as sailors wore in their daily duties in the days of sail. It may have applied to other areas of industry too. To-day’s equivalent is jeans.

DUNNY:

The second-most important structure of one’s abode. Your kitchen feeds your primary need, food, and the DUNNY takes care of the other end of the natural process of life. In my younger days the DUNNY was set apart from the house, but is now an integral part of domestic architecture. In some remote parts, the DUNNY is also known as the LONG DROP, as it was constructed so, as to not to have to be attended to, too frequently.

DUST DEVILS:

Clockwise swirlings of dust in open areas like paddocks and plains. It is nearly vertical, and travels quite quickly across the ground. Usually seen on hot days.