A Good Supply of Weed



aboriginal australia

WHY ‘E’ IS POPULAR

September I, 1927. PINKIE. 23

“E” is the most popular letter because it was the beginning and last of Eve; the beginning of Eternity, the end of Time and Space; the beginning of every End and the end of every race. It’s the end of fame and Fortune. It is also a most unpopular letter. For it is never in cash, always in Debt, everlasting in misery, never out of Danger, and always in Rent, hell and Near Beer.

 

 

SMOKING PIPES

F Fowler 1859 MSS Mitchell Library

The ‘cutty’ is of all shapes, sizes and shades. Some are Negro heads, set with rows o0f very white teeth – some are mermaids, showing their more presentable halves up the front of the bowls, and stowing away their weedy fundaments under the items. Some are Turkish caps – some are Russian skulls. Some are Houris, some are expressions of the French, some are Margaret Catchpoles. Some are as small as my lady’s thimble – others as large as an old Chelsea teacup. Everybody has one, from the little pinafored schoolboy to the old veteran who came out with the second batch of convicts. A cutty-bowl, like a Creole’s eye, is most prized when blackest. Tobacco, I should add here, is seldom sold in a cut form, Each man carries a cake about with him, like a card case; each boy has his stick of Cavendish, like so much candy. The cigars usually smoked are manilas, which are as cheap and good as can be met with in any part of the world. Lola Montez, during her Australian tour, spoke well of them. What stronger puff could they have than hers?
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LIFE-SAVING FACTS for every family in the colony

PAM88/767
R COAD

1889 Sydney

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The following list is ‘some’ of the licensed hotels operating in Sydney in that year as detailed in the Bigges Report.

HOTELS IN SYDNEY IN 1819

Mitchell Library files.

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The Australia Hotel foundation stone 18th June 1889 by Henry Parkes
Their advertisement in the Bulletin advertised ‘superior accommodation at 12s 6p a night.’

Not at all Colonial!
THE ARM CHAIR

Oct 1853 periodical Sydney

Scene: George Street, Sydney. A gent standing at the door of a lodging-house, a drayman is discovered waiting for his payment.
Gent: What’s the damage?
Drayman: Five shillings, sir, ow you please.

Gent: Ha! There you are, and the cheapest job I’ve had done since the Rush was announced. Why don’t you come in and have a nobbler.
Drayman: No, thank you, sir, I never takes a nobbler.
Gent: Oh! You’re a teetotaller, are you?
Drayman: No, sir, I likes me glass at home, but I never takes on treats.
Gent: Ah! Not at all Colonial, I see, good day!

Tombstone

To the memory of Tommus Sykes

It wasn’t roomatiz or growt

Az snuffed my mortal kaqndle out;
Nor woz it famun, bawl or fite
Az turned my mornin inter nite;
I dyed az many dyed before,
And still keep dyin by the score ñ
I sunk intoo this erly tumb

Throo dinkin stuff call’ d’doctored rum’

Advertisement for Rainbow Inn Sydney 1830s

By landlord Toogood.

A Rainbow was built not only of wood
But of stones, bricks and mortar and kept by Toogood
Stands on the corner of king St where you can avail

Yourself if you choose with the best of good ale
My motto’s ‘industry’ and ever shall be
I think with great pleasure all my friends that I see
Buy naught but the best if bettered
Spirits, ales, wines ñ at the Rainbow

Beehive Inn

Sign posted 1840s Goulburn

Aust Journal. 1869

In this house we’re all alive
Good liquor makes us funn
If you are dry come in and try
The virtue of our honey

Beehive Inn (pub name)

A similar sign at the Beehive Inn Richmond.

We’re all alive within this hive
Good liquor makes us funny

So if you are dry step in and try
The flower of our honey

A passing traveller thought he’d add a comment

I am a fly and very dry

And I’d like to taste your honey
But if I step in your bees might sting
Because I’ve got no bloody money.

1889s when the Beehive Inn opened at Cuttabri

The faithful Irishman

From Old & New Sydney by O West. Pub 1882

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pub notice

Since man has proved to be unjust
How can I tell what man to trust
And to prevent further sorrow

Pay day I’ll trust tomorrow
My ale is good my measure just

My care here is no mans sorrow
So pay today ñ I’ll trust tomorrow

Drinker’s table or how 2 pints = 30 days

2 pints 1 quart
2 quarts 1 argument

1 argument 1 fight

1 fight 1 cop
1 cop 1 arrest
1 arrest 1 judge
1 judge 30 days